9. Your knuckles are inflamed or purple

What it could be: Cancer

This one seems odd, but it’s another sign cancer could be looming. The University of Rochester Medical Center explains dermatomyositis causes muscle inflammation and rash — and if you have it, you may notice red or purple spot developing on your knuckles.

This condition typically affects those from 50 to 70 years old.

The good news is even if you have dermatomyositis, it’s not a surefire guarantee something is seriously wrong with you.

In some cases, you may have just inherited the genes and will only notice the skin symptoms.

8. You’re getting extreme headaches

What it could be: Brain aneurysm

You might just think your worsening headaches are another byproduct of getting older, but that’s not the case. And if you feel like you’re having the worst headache of your entire life, you may actually be having a brain aneurysm.

Everyday Health explains an aneurysm is a bulge in a blood vessel, and it can burst, causing excruciating pain.

In some cases, however, those who have had an aneurysm burst are able to shake off the feeling and go about their daily life, despite bleeding that may be going on in the brain.

If you feel like you’re having a particularly bad headache, call your doctor immediately.

7. Your gums are inflamed

What it could lead to Heart disease

There’s more of a link between your gums and your heart than you think. Colgate notes if your gums are swollen and inflamed, you may have gum disease.

And if that’s the case, then this can contribute to heart disease, too, as the bacteria from your gums can enter the bloodstream and eventually cause blood clots and heart attacks.

Make sure to attend your semi-annual teeth cleanings.

Both your teeth and your heart will thank you for it.

6. You’re urinating more often

What it could be: Type 2 diabetes

If you know that diabetes runs in your family and you haven’t gotten a physical in a while, it’s always a good idea to get everything checked outpost-50.

You can have Type 2 diabetes without even knowing it — and one of the signs is a frequent need to urinate.

Mayo Clinic explains when you have diabetes, your kidneys are working extra hard to filter the excess sugar.

But if they can’t keep up with the demand, that sugar is excreted through your urine, which triggers the need to go. You may also notice that your thirst has increased when this happens.